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Cleveland Clinic launches breast cancer vaccine study

(KSLA)
Published: Oct. 26, 2021 at 9:30 AM EDT|Updated: Oct. 26, 2021 at 9:16 PM EDT
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CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - Cleveland Clinic researchers are starting a study for a vaccine that is aimed at preventing triple-negative breast cancer, the most aggressive and lethal form of the disease.

“We are hopeful that this research will lead to more advanced trials to determine the effectiveness of the vaccine against this highly aggressive type of breast cancer,” said G. Thomas Budd, M.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Taussig Cancer Institute and principal investigator of the study. “Long term, we are hoping that this can be a true preventive vaccine that would be administered to healthy women to prevent them from developing triple-negative breast cancer, the form of breast cancer for which we have the least effective treatments.”

According to Cleveland Clinic officials, triple-negative breast cancer accounts for a disproportionately higher percentage of breast cancer deaths and has a higher rate of recurrence.

Cleveland Clinic officials added this form of breast cancer is twice as likely to occur in Black women, and approximately 70% to 80% of the breast tumors that occur in women with mutations in the BRCA1 genes are triple-negative breast cancer.

“This vaccine approach represents a potential new way to control breast cancer,” said Vincent Tuohy, Ph.D., the primary inventor of the vaccine and staff immunologist at Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute. “The long-term objective of this research is to determine if this vaccine can prevent breast cancer before it occurs, particularly the more aggressive forms of this disease that predominate in high-risk women.”

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